Documents in the Category: Access Spacing

Combined AMAG & AM Manual

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 TRB's newest publications on access management draw on national and state research to respond to the need for a more coordinated approach to transportation and community design that preserves the safe and efficient movement of peoples and goods, provides supporting networks in developed areas, and reinforces desired urban form.

Model Land Development and Subdivision Regulations that Support Access Management

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 Effective local access management requires planning as well as regulatory solutions. Communities should establish a policy framework that supports access management in the local comprehensive plan, prepare corridor or access management plans for specific problem areas, and encourage good site planning techniques. Land development and subdivision regulations should be amended accordingly and communities may also consider a separate access management ordinance.

Access and Roadside Management Standards

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These standards and guidelines have been developed to establish uniformity for encroachments upon roads in the South Carolina State Highway System so as to provide for the safe and efficient movement of traffic while allowing reasonable access to abutting property. This document does provide a majority of the information needed for encroachments onto the State Highway System.

Recent changes include:

Access Management Application Guidelines (AMAG)

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TRB's Access Management Application Guidelines (AMAG) focuses on the applications of access management concepts and provides research-based guidelines on access management treatments and procedures for their applications. The AMAG is a how-to tool for continuing the evolution of access management applications in the United States.

Corridor Access Management

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FHWA/Safety/Intersection/Intersection Safety

Imagine a multilane urban/suburban roadway where traffic is heavy, yet moves well; accommodates drivers, pedestrians, and bicyclists; allows easy entry to and exit from businesses and other destinations; and has fewer crashes and other conflicts. Chances are this road is benefitting from corridor access management, a strategy that seeks an appropriate balance between the safety and mobility of a roadway facility with the access needs of adjacent land uses.

Second International Conference on Access Management Proceedings 2014

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Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Access Management held in Shanghai, China, September 25-27, 2014. Sponsored by the Access Management Committee of the Transportation Research Board; Tongji University; Shanghai Jiaotong University; the Research Institute of the Ministry of Public Security, PRC; the Research Institute of Highway, PRC; the Ministry of Transportation, PRC; and the Construction Institute of ASCE

Access Management Manual 2014 - 2nd Edition

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TRB’s Access Management Manual, second edition, provides guidance on a coordinated approach to transportation and community design that is designed to help enhance mobility, provide greater mode choice, and improve environmental quality. The content is interdisciplinary, with guidance pertinent to various levels of government as well as to pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorized vehicles, including trucks and buses. Access management is addressed comprehensively, as a critical part of network and land use planning. Key updates include

Influence of Road Cross Section on Access Spacing

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This report presents a study on the influences of select cross-sectional-related design elements (specifically median configurations and bicycle 
lanes) and their impact on crash severity and type, as well as the associated driver gap acceptance for turning maneuvers at midblock driveway 
locations on urban arterials. The primary goal of this proposed research is to better understand how the median and bicycle lane configurations 
can influence safety and operations at driveway locations.

Signal Spacing

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Stover, V.G. Signal Spacing,  Technical Memorandum, Center for Urban Transportation Research, (October 2007), unpublished. Available at http://www.cutr.usf.edu/programs/pcm/pub.shtml

            This technical memorandum addresses the rationale for spacing of intersections that are signalized and those that might be considered for signalization at some time in the future. It includes draft prototype regulations.