Documents

Channelized Right-Turn Lanes

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NCHRP Project 03-89, “Channelized Right-Turn Lanes,” Active TRB Project. MRIGlobal submitted the final report for this project in July of 2011. As indicated in the summary for NCHRP Project 3-72, the study of the channelized right-turn lanes exceeded the available budget and so was deemed outside the scope of that project. Subsequently, NCHRP Project 03-89 then directly focused on the design and use of channelized right-turn lanes.

The Role of Access Management in Sustainable Development

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Williams, K. and H. Levinson, “The Role of Access Management in Sustainable Development,” Proceedings of the First T&DI Congress, American Society of Civil Engineers, Chicago Illinois, (2011)
This paper explores the role of access management in accomplishing a more sustainable approach to transportation and development planning in the US. Topics include land use and transportation relationships, network planning and activity center strategies, and site design concepts for urban arterial development. Policy changes are suggested.

Access Management Past, Present and Future

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Williams, K. and H. Levinson. “Access Management Past, Present and Future,” Proceedings of the 8th National Access Management Conference, Baltimore, MD, (2008)

This historical overview of the evolution of access management practice would be useful for Chapter 1 of the AMM2. Another key reference that could supplement any such discussion of the history of AM is: P. Demosthenes, “Access Management: An Historical Perspective” presented to the International Right of Way Association, Albuquerque, NM (1999).

Traffic Engineering Handbook

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Institute of Transportation Engineers, Traffic Engineering Handbook, 6th Edition, (2008)

Chapter 13 of this Handbook, Access Management, was authored by Philip Demosthenes and Vergil G. Stover. Chapter 13 includes an introduction to access management providing an historical perspective, a review of legal issues of interest to traffic engineers, and proceeds to present current practice in policies, programs and access related design elements.

Practices in Access Management

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Demosthenes, P. “Practices in Access Management,” ITE Journal, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., vol 80, issue 1, (January 2010, pp. 46 – 51)

This article provides practical guidance on developing and implementing an access management program. It includes guidance relative to access classification systems, access design practices, variances and corridor access management plans. It will be especially useful in the chapters on access classification systems and state program development.

Design/Development Principles for Livable Suburban Roadways

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This research investigates the interaction between road section design and adjacent site design with the goal of pairing roadway design criteria (in terms of the maximum number of lanes and design speed) with urban design criteria (in terms of levels of activity, location of access, and relation to street). The research hypothesizes that a minimum of three arterial roadway prototypes is needed to serve travel demands and that there are three types of activity levels in suburban communities.

Applying Access Management Across the Transect

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Presentation Strader, Brad. “Applying Access Management Across the Transect: Complete Streets,” Proceedings of the 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (presentation only), (January 2011) This presentation suggests a simpler adaptation of the CSS transect framework in ITE’s Designing Walkable Thoroughfares (2010) as a means of organizing access management strategies according to context. It also offers several case examples of these applications in typical rural, suburban and urban contexts. Figure 2 illustrates the overall concept.

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.

Basic elements of the approach are as follows:

Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares

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The context sensitive solutions (CSS) approach keys thoroughfare types with place types that reference aspects of the roadside context. An implicit goal of CSS is to reduce the dominance of roadway capacity in roadway design decisions by more directly integrating other modal and community design considerations – particularly those design details critical to supporting non-auto modes in the urban context. The approach also strives to maintain an optimal balance between desired roadway operations and the roadside context.
Basic elements of the approach are as follows:

NCHRP Report 672 Roundabouts: An Informational Guide Second Edition

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 672: Roundabouts: An Informational Guide – Second Edition explores the planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation of roundabouts. The report also addresses issues that may be useful in helping to explain the trade-offs associated with roundabouts.

1993 Access Management Conference

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Conference Overview The first Access Management Conference was held in Vail, Colorado on August 1-4, 1993. The conference was sponsored by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FIIWA), and the Transportation Research Board (TRB). It was attended by over 150 persons from a wide range of transportation disciplines (including engineers, planners, and legal experts) representing federal agencies, state and local departments of transportation, and private consultants.

Modeling Operating Speed

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TRB’s Transportation Research E-Circular E-C151: Modeling Operating Speed is a synthesis of existing operating speed models developed in different regions of the world. The models are grouped according to roadway type. 

Limitations and deficiencies in existing operating speed models and suggestions for future work are also identified. 

Practitioner perspectives on the potential use of speed prediction models in road design practice are provided from both the perspective of the United States and the international community.

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