safety

Corridor Access Management

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FHWA/Safety/Intersection/Intersection Safety

Imagine a multilane urban/suburban roadway where traffic is heavy, yet moves well; accommodates drivers, pedestrians, and bicyclists; allows easy entry to and exit from businesses and other destinations; and has fewer crashes and other conflicts. Chances are this road is benefitting from corridor access management, a strategy that seeks an appropriate balance between the safety and mobility of a roadway facility with the access needs of adjacent land uses.

Safety Impacts of Access Management: Two Case Studies

  • Posted on: Mon, 09/23/2013 - 21:04
  • By: fbroen
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Presentation Outline

  • Case Study 1-Nebraska Avenue Lane Diet

    • Before: 4-lane undivided

    • After: 2-lane divided with TWLTL

  • Case Study 2-Hillsborough Avenue Median Installation

    • Before: 6-lane with TWLTL

    • After: 6-lane with raised medians

 

Case Study 1: Discussion

  • Significant Safety Improvement

  • Improvement of all Analyzed Crash Types

  • From Worse to Better than SW Average

Safety Impacts of Access Management: Two Case Studies

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Peter Hsu, P.E.

Florida Department of Transportation

District 7

 

W. T. Bowman, P.E

Tindale-Oliver & Associates, Inc.

Tampa, FL

Presentation Outline

  • Case Study 1-Nebraska Avenue Lane Diet
    • Before:  4-lane undivided
    • After:  2-lane divided with TWLTL
  • Case Study 2-Hillsborough Avenue Median Installation
    • Before:  6-lane with TWLTL
    • After:  6-lane with raised medians

Case Study 1: Discussion

Regional Implementation of Access Management

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The Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) conducted a survey of Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) to assess the implementation of access management at the regional level. The intent of the survey was to determine if access management was being implemented at the regional level; what had been implemented; and how implementation was achieved. Survey responses were divided into three categories: all respondents, respondents serving a population of one million or more (population subset), and respondents serving 25 or more member agencies (agency subset).

NCHRP Report 687: Guidelines for Ramp and Interchange Spacing

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These guidelines do not establish ramp and interchange spacing standards. Rather they provide a process and criteria for assessing spacing in a given context to assist planners and designers in considering the feasibility of new or rebuilt interchanges and ramps. Interchange spacing is defined as the distance between the centerlines of successive crossroads with interchanges on a freeway.

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